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 Post subject: Combo
PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 8:53 am 
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Almost finished my combo, just the rear panels to do which won't take long. Not too bad for a first attempt. Excuse the crappy cell phone pic and the little sawdust specs :) I need to brush them off.


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2020 7:58 pm 
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Great work mate!

Awesome job!

What tools did you need dit the build?
And what kind of joints did you use?


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2020 2:42 pm 
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I have to fess up and say that my tools are extremely limited :oops:

I have an old table saw that I had to fix first as the blade was not perpendicular to the table so I had to remedy that so I could get square cuts.
I had that and a jig saw and I used a Dremel drill screw holes. All the radius forming (edges, corners) was done by hand with a sanding block.

This was also the very first time I'd done tolex. It was very much a figure it out as I go kind of project. Id love to tell you all i had some grand plan but that's not the case.

The joints are very primitive. Just glued and screwed with a 3/4" strengthening joist. The cab is extremely strong. It's not the fanciest method but it's effective. I countersunk the screws just enough so I could put a veneer or plastic wood and sand smooth.

The Tolex is Wine Taurus and the grill is Oxblood colour. I think it looks a little funny in the pic. I used 1/2" baltic birch ply for the cab. The bottom is 3/4" as I had that piece laying around.


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2020 11:18 am 
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Looks great to me! You could have said you had a plan and all kinds of great tools, and I'd still say it looks great.

There is some magic to carpentry that I just don't get. I can measure 10x, clamp, double-check, triple-measure, etc - and my cuts always seem to be off by 1/8" or so. Same goes with gluing, seems like no how patient I am with getting things lined up and the clamps just right, once the glue sets, something is always off by 1/8" or so.

I think good tools help. But I also feel it's one of those things where experience is invaluable. Like most pursuits, I figure experience gives you that intuition for how to avoid things being a little off, as they are in my case.

Anyway, great work! I did the electronics myself for my Triwatt, but had Trinity build the cab for me.


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2020 12:41 pm 
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Matt,
As long as you cut longer you can always trim ! I look at the combo and all I see is where I could have been more accurate, where the joint isn't quite at 90 degrees etc but you have to just let it go and enjoy it for what it is. The flaws are what make it mine so to speak.

I found when clamping to go slow and adjust as I tighten, the clamps will move the position.

I cut the top and bottom then figured out the height, took a couple of trims to get it to the min allowable height.
After that I cut the baffle and front panel for the amp, the piece that's in black tolex, Once all that was figured out and everything fit. I did the tolex and grill put the feet on and then finally the rear panels.

Took me about 4 days in total. I actually just put the rear panels on a day or so ago.


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2020 1:58 pm 
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Location: Shawnee, OK
Two tips for cutting, Matt: 1) Most saw blades take off 1/8"of material (kerf) so it depends on which side of the line you cut on; the offcut (waste piece ) is usually marked with "X" and you want to cut with the blade outside the mark on the "good piece", otherwise you've taken about an 1/8" off. 2) Get double sided turners tape from a woodworking store or online, tape 2 or more pieces together, lay out your measurements and cut once for identical pieces. Hope this might help. Or is it clear as mud? :hmmm:

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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2020 3:02 pm 
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Exactly so you are either measuring the cut from the inside or outside edge of the blade. I never thought to cover that !


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2020 5:10 pm 
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Hankules wrote:
Two tips for cutting, Matt: 1) Most saw blades take off 1/8"of material (kerf) so it depends on which side of the line you cut on; the offcut (waste piece ) is usually marked with "X" and you want to cut with the blade outside the mark on the "good piece", otherwise you've taken about an 1/8" off. 2) Get double sided turners tape from a woodworking store or online, tape 2 or more pieces together, lay out your measurements and cut once for identical pieces. Hope this might help. Or is it clear as mud? :hmmm:


Definitely clear. I think my main problem is a lack of decent tools. I don't have a table saw, or even saw horses. Just a too-small cheapie table. So I use a circular saw for pretty much all cuts. I clamp the wood to the table. And I also have a saw-guide that clamps to the wood so I don't have to rely on a steady hand to make a straight cut. So I measure and draw a line where I want the cut. Then I have to measure and draw another line which is where the saw-clamp will go (i.e. to make up for the width of the blade plate). Even when clamped, the saw-guide has a little bit of play in it; and in the process of clamping, it always seems to move just a hair.

So even before I have to take the kerf into consideration, I have introduced multiple sources of possible error. I strictly follow the "measure thrice, cut once rule", but between drawing multiple lines, having to clamp a saw-guide, and using a circular saw, it's just really hard to get a cut that is perfectly parallel to the factory edge.

Having a decent table saw would go a long way! But I feel I can't justify the cost (and the storage space) for something I won't use too frequently.


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 Post subject: Re: Combo
PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2020 9:28 pm 
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Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 3:42 pm
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Location: Qualicum Beach, BC
Floyd:
The cabinet looks good. It might have a few flaws, but that adds character. As long as it gets the job done, you were successful.

Matt:
Yes, it's hard to do precision woodwork unless you have the proper tools. I have a table saw and use it just about every day.

I also use a circular saw and a guide for cutting large pieces of plywood. I find I can be pretty precise with that technique. You just have to know exactly what the distance is from the edge of the saw's baseplate to the blade. You can determine this by clamping the guide to a piece of scrap wood, making a cut, then measuring how far the guide is from the cut edge. In my case, it's 5 1/8". Then just count back this distance from where you want the cut and mark the wood.

I have 8-foot and 4-foot metal straight edges that I use as guides. I find they don't move once they are clamped to the wood. Cutting two identical pieces of wood at the same time by clamping one on top of the other is a good tip.

Careful measuring the key to all woodwork. You can always cut more off if the piece is too big, but it's hard to put it back on if the piece is too small!


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